School of Card Knocks

Whether you’re a social media boss with 1M+ followers, entry level recent college graduate on the rise, well established cubicle all-star by day and Shark Tank entrepreneur by night or just a legitimate shot-calling “Olivia Pope” style attorney, understanding proper business card etiquette is a must.

There are a few things to keep in mind when giving or receiving business cards. First, is that,...

Money in the Thank

In the world of business, thank you cards are like a “nice to see you” hug on steroids. We don’t know about you, but at Urban Professor there’s nothing quite like a “nice to see you” hug. Much like a great hug, thank you cards are warmer, more sincere, and standout from the pack of others compared to sending an e-mail, phone call, text, or nothing at all.

In a day and age of increased technology, business execs have an even heightened appreciation for the effort and time one takes to buy a card, fill it out with thoughts customized for them, lick the nasty tasting envelope seal (amazing that it’s 2010 and we haven’t invented an envelope seal that taste like Kool-Aid, “Red” flavor), pay a small, but, still additional postage fee, and then locate the nearest postal shipper to send it their way. I mean c’mon, that has to beat an IM, e-mail, e-card, phone call, or tweet on any day. You’ll also quickly find out that thank you cards won’t get stuck in the voicemail call back list, e-mail spam, or HR forget me piles. Surprising as it may be, the simple gesture of sending a thank you card usually triggers the recipient to reach out to you to say Thank You for the card if nothing more.

A good thank you card should usually be blank or contain minimal pre-written manufactured text besides “Thank You”; all other text should be from you. The card should be on nice, yet simple design card stock, and you can buy them by the pack or singles (and no the singles are not called “Loosies”). A pack can range from $1.99 to upwards of $9.99 and they can be purchased anywhere from drugstores with greeting card inventory to stationery stores like Hallmark or Papyrus.

Your message in the cards should be heartfelt, purposeful, and speak to subject matter in which both you and the recipient are familiar. As far as sending them, they can be sent whenever, there’s rarely a time when someone isn’t due for a good thanking. However, thank you cards hold an even heightened appreciation when received promptly after an occasion or meeting such as an interview, internship completion, school acceptance, or referral letter to name a few. You can even send them upon the not so good news, such as not receiving the job offer. Hell, you’ll be surprised at the opportunities this act can open up, it’s truly the politest way to say “screw you, your loss”.

All this thanking and stuff has us feeling so warm, we would like to thank all of our readers and may you soon discover that thank you cards may be the best use of $10 or less that exist.

School of Card Knocks

Whether you’re like “Calvin,” and you just got your first McDonald’s job, like “Tommy” and you ain’t got no job, or like Barack Obama and you have the most powerful job, understanding proper business card etiquette is a must.

There are a few things to keep in mind when giving or receiving business cards. First, is that, business cards are a representation of one’s self. If you are the giver of the business card, you should present your cards with the same pride you would as if were presenting a miniature version of yourself to the person. This means no bent corners, folds, creases or tattered edges. The use of a good business card holder will certainly remedy this. A good business card holder is typically leather or silver and can range from $25 to $150. Make sure your business card is void of notes from previous conversations with any other business contact. Receiving one of those is about as much fun as your girl calling you the wrong name (even if it is harmless, it just feels violating and insincere).

Next, if you are leaving your house or office, you want to make sure you never leave without them, and plenty of them. You never know when a great opportunity will present itself!

Short of throwing your card at someone like a ninja star, you will be okay when giving someone your card, if you take heed to the above. Keep in mind, if you are mailing someone your card or networking with someone who must then speak to another person on your behalf, it is best to give them an additional card for the intended end recipient. You know what they say, “it ain’t no fun, if the homies can’t have none.”

As important, if not more important than giving someone your business card, is correctly receiving a business card. Remember, business cards are a source of pride for many people, particularly when exchanging business cards with people in various international cultures.

Business cards can be great conversation starters, ice breakers, or conversation closers. It is a sign of respect to observe, review, and comment upon receiving someone’s card (as opposed to stuffing it in your pocket or card holder) . You can respond with something as basic as “what city is this area code from?” or something more detailed like “nice slogan” or “this card is a good stock.” An acknowledgement of one’s card goes a long way, you wouldn’t exactly have a date pay for a meal, and not acknowledge the meal or the effort, would you?

Since business cards are an essential tool for networking, be sure to write notes from your conversations with them on the back of the card soon after receiving it so you’ll remember both the contact and the conversation (See Contact High). Lastly, it is extremely important to send a follow-up e-mail or card after exchanging business cards to continue the networking relationship.

It’s rough out there, but, what better way to learn than at the School of Card Knocks? Enjoy. U Define Success.

Money in the Thank

In the world of business, thank you cards are like a “nice to see you” hug on steroids. We don’t know about you, but at Urban Professor there’s nothing quite like a “nice to see you” hug. Much like a great hug, thank you cards are warmer, more sincere, and standout from the pack of others compared to sending an e-mail, phone call, text, or nothing at all.

School of Card Knocks

Whether you’re like “Calvin,” and you just got your first McDonald’s job, like “Tommy” and you ain’t got no job, or like Barack Obama and you have the most powerful job, understanding proper business card etiquette is a must.

Mail in the Coffin – The 101 on Leaving and Sending Messages

Gone are the days where you could put on your shiny suit, walk up to a company of interest in your Slippery Earls, hand in your resume and expect to be contacted. Yep, those days are long gone, along with the shiny suits. Sorry, Diddy.

Office Mates

You know all of those movies and TV shows where two co-workers fall in love and live happily ever after? They’re often penned, acted, and directed by people who’ve never actually worked in an office setting. They know as much about work romance as a sushi chef knows fatback.

Keepin’ Tabs

The relationships we build determine much of what happens to us. Even at the drive-thru. Don’t believe it? Be verbally abusive to a cashier then go have your food tested in a lab. You’ll see how important relationships are then.

Let’s Talk About Text

With more cell phone users turning to texting instead of – gasp – actually talking to people, it’s important for everyone to learn that a little etiquette goes a long way – even for communication via text.

Contact High

They’re at it again. All those business folks swagged up from the toe up at a corporate event, trying to get themselves or their businesses put on. Well, that’s what we call networking and, if done the right way, you too can reap the benefits of this very valuable skill.


#UnapologeticallyDriven